Recent Posts

EU Must Step Up to Coronavirus Challenge, Warn Stricken Member-states

EU Must Step Up to Coronavirus Challenge, Warn Stricken Member-states

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Spain and Italy have demanded more European help as they fight still-surging coronavirus infections amid the continent’s worst crisis since World War II. In the U.S., authorities urged millions around New York City to stop travelling to keep the virus contained.…

Corona Gossip: Rome Mayor Asks Citizens to Snitch on Quarantine Breakers

Corona Gossip: Rome Mayor Asks Citizens to Snitch on Quarantine Breakers

ROME — Rome mayor Virginia Raggi has urged citizens to become government informants by reporting on their neighbors who violate any of the coronavirus lockdown rules. Raggi has created an internet hotline to facilitate reporting on disobedient citizens who fail to comply in any way…

UK Fire Brigades Drafted to Transport Bodies If Coronavirus Crisis Worsens

UK Fire Brigades Drafted to Transport Bodies If Coronavirus Crisis Worsens

British firemen have been drafted into the fight against coronavirus to deliver food and medicines, drive ambulances, and retrieve bodies.

The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) has agreed to emergency measures to support other blue-light first responder units and civilian activities for a duration of at least two months. There are around 48,000 firemen and emergency control operators across the country.

FBU General-Secretary Matt Wrack said in comments reported by ITV: “We face a public health crisis unparalleled in our lifetimes. The coronavirus outbreak is now a humanitarian emergency and firefighters rightly want to help their communities.

“Firefighters are fantastic at teamwork, are experienced in driving emergency vehicles and, as a service rooted in the community, may be best placed to deliver essential items to the most vulnerable,” he said.

“Many fear the loss of life in this outbreak could be overwhelming — and firefighters, who often handle terrible situations and incidents, are ready to step in to assist with body retrieval.”

The announcement comes as the London Ambulance Service and Scotland Yard have asked staff who have recently gone into retirement or who have left the services to return to the frontline. Retired and former firemen have also been asked to return.

Metropolitan Police Service Commissioner Cressida Dick said on Friday: “On behalf of London, and all the men and women of the Met, it is important that we take all reasonable steps to bolster our numbers.

“Demands on us will grow and vary over the coming weeks but I want people to know and see that the Met is here for them. We must maintain our operational resilience and continue to provide the best possible service to London.

“Police officers overwhelmingly join ‘the job’ to help people and to make a difference, and that desire will be as strong today as it was the very first day they joined.

“I am hopeful that these exceptionally experienced and knowledgeable former colleagues choose to come and be part of our team and support London at this extraordinary time – either as a re-employed police officer, special constable or a volunteer.”

Even if emergency services are able to increase numbers, those on the frontline are at risk of catching coronavirus themselves, with The Guardian reporting that in some of the worst-hit areas of the country — such as London which is served by the Met — one-in-five police officers are self-isolating or off sick.

TRACES OF ROMAN ENGINEERING FOUND IN ANCIENT PORT TOWN

TRACES OF ROMAN ENGINEERING FOUND IN ANCIENT PORT TOWN

Traces of Roman engineering found in ancient port town Some two millennia ago, Lechaion, one of the ports of the ancient city of Corinth, occupied a special place on the map of southern Greece. It was a strategic point that easily connected to a number…

EIGHT-YEAR-OLD SWEDISH-AMERICAN GIRL PULLS PRE-VIKING ERA SWORD FROM LAKE

EIGHT-YEAR-OLD SWEDISH-AMERICAN GIRL PULLS PRE-VIKING ERA SWORD FROM LAKE

Eight-year-old Swedish-American girl pulls pre-Viking era sword from lake An 8- year – old girl on vacation with her family discovered a  pre – Viking Era Sword in a Swedish lake, leading to locals jokingly naming her the “Queen of Sweden.” The ancient artifact was…

LONDON: CROSSRAIL DIG UNEARTHS 13,000 VICTORIAN JAM JARS

LONDON: CROSSRAIL DIG UNEARTHS 13,000 VICTORIAN JAM JARS

London: Crossrail dig unearths 13,000 Victorian jam jars

Marmalade was one of the condiments produced in the factory by Crosse & Blackwel

Marmalade was one of the condiments produced in the factory by Crosse & Blackwel

When the London Archeology Museum (MOLA) investigated the site of a proposed new London train station, they did not expect to find a stash of over 13,000 smashed pickling pots and jam jars dating back to the 1900s.

The stash was discovered during the construction of the railway station under an old nightclub. The area used to be a dumping ground for rejection from a factory that stood on the site until 1921 in Crosse & Blackwell (a British specialty food company).

The find included over 13,000 various containers. They ranged from bottles of mushroom catsup (a popular Victorian condiment) Piccalilli pots, and jars for marmalade and jam. All of them were discovered in a cistern that stood beneath the factory’s warehouse.

Nigel Jeffries, an archaeologist with the Museum of London Archaeology, explained that the cistern used to be filled with water during the factory’s production.

It was built in order to power the steam engines in the factory, but when the building was redesigned in the 1870s, the cistern became obsolete. After that, the cistern was used as a landfill by the Victorians.

Mushroom Catsup was popular with Victorians

Mushroom Catsup was popular with Victorians

While it may seem strange that archaeologists would want to dig up the Victorian trash pile, a person’s trash can tell us a lot about how they lived. Trash piles are a historian’s treasure.

This discovery is helping researchers learn more about “the tastes and palates of the Victorians”, Nigel Jeffries pointed out.

Crosse & Blackwell were based in this area of London between 1830 and 1921, right smack dab in the middle of the industrial revolution and the Victorian era.

Records of the factory say it produced “a very distinctive pungency to the surrounding atmosphere”, which is saying a lot considering it was hard to smell anything during that time period through London’s notorious smog.

The find was originally made by London’s Crossrail Project, a government-funded project that’s revolutionizing London’s train system and building a new railway for the city.

Due to the nature of the project, they have to do a lot of digging, and they’ve dug up all sorts of archaeological finds recently, including several skeletons dating back to the Black Plague, an entire mass-grave dating back to the Dark Ages, and some history of Bedlam Hospital. They’re taking great pains to ensure that no British history is lost in the construction of the new rail line.

These decorative jars were used to sell preserved ginger

These decorative jars were used to sell preserved ginger

Source: bbc

DENMARK BARBARIAN BATTLE: ARCHAEOLOGISTS JUST DISCOVERED THE MANGLED REMAINS

DENMARK BARBARIAN BATTLE: ARCHAEOLOGISTS JUST DISCOVERED THE MANGLED REMAINS

Denmark barbarian battle: Archaeologists Just Discovered the Mangled Remains A ragtag troop of about 400 Germanic tribesmen marched into battle in Denmark about 2,000 years ago against a mysterious adversary and were slaughtered to the last man. Or at least that’s the story their bones tell.…

MEDIEVAL VILLAGE UNEARTHED IN DENMARK

MEDIEVAL VILLAGE UNEARTHED IN DENMARK

Lost medieval village discovered in Denmark Traces of three courtyards surrounded by a ditch marks out an area, which archaeologists have interpreted as the center of a village dating back to the Middle Ages in Tollerup, East Denmark. Historical sources suggest that the farms belonged…

ANCIENT ROME — CONSTRUCTION WORKERS FIND RARE INTACT ROMAN TOMB

ANCIENT ROME — CONSTRUCTION WORKERS FIND RARE INTACT ROMAN TOMB

Construction Workers Find Rare Intact Roman Tomb

‘The Tomb of the Athlete’ includes four bodies, a coin, offerings of chicken, rabbit and lamb and strigils, the symbol of Roman sportsmen

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/construction-workers-find-rare-intact-tomb-rome-180969247/#49AkMEfdgbeVZkRc.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter
‘The Tomb of the Athlete’ includes four bodies, a coin, offerings of chicken, rabbit and lamb and strigils, the symbol of Roman sportsmen

It is a rare day when archeologists find an ancient burial that has not been destroyed by natural processes, ravaged by war, or plundered by hunters of artifacts.

It is why King Tut’s untouched tomb was so significant and why archaeologists are going gaga over the tomb of a Greek warrior discovered in Pylos.

Add another to the list; archeologists uncovered an untouched Roman tomb in Rome several weeks ago that they call the Athlete’s Tomb. Local Italy reports.

The tomb was found in the Case Rosse area west of the center of Rome by an earthmover working to extend an aqueduct about 6 feet underground.

Inside lay the undisturbed remains of 4 people, including a man in his 30s, a man in his 50s, a man between the age of 35 to 45, and a woman of undetermined age.

Francesco Prosperetti, who oversees archaeology in Rome, tells Elisabetta Povoledo at The New York Times that finding the tomb was sheer luck. “Had the machine dug just four inches to the left, we would have never found the tomb,” he says.

The discovery also unearthed an assortment of jugs and dishes, a bronze coin, along with dishes of chicken, rabbit and another animal believed to be a lamb or goat, likely offerings to sustain them in the afterlife.

Among the trove were two strigils, blunt hooks that Romans used to clean themselves and wipe off oil while bathing and that athletes used to scrape away sweat.

In fact, the strigil was considered the symbol of an athlete in the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome.

Still, calling the find the “Tomb of the Athlete,” is more or less a marketing move, Fabio Turchetta, one of the archaeologists working on the site, tells Povoledo since all the men inside are over 35 and would have been well past their prime by classical standards. “To say there was an athlete is a bit of stretch, but it works journalistically,” as he puts it diplomatically.

Based on the coin found in the tomb, which includes an image of Minerva on one side and a horse head with the word “Romano” on the other, the tomb dates between 335 and 312 B.C.E. during the heyday of the Roman Republic.

Researchers have begun the process of removing the bodies from the tomb, which will be sent to the laboratory for analysis and DNA testing to determine if they are a family.

A paleobotanist also collected samples of pollen and plant material to help figure out the flora of the area when the tomb was constructed.

The structure itself has been documented by a laser scan and will be sealed up once excavations are complete.

Turchetta tells Povoledo that the area the tomb was found in has been heavily surveyed and excavated in the past, so finding the intact chamber was surprising and emotional.

This isn’t the first time that construction in Rome has uncovered amazing finds. Just last year, while expanding the metro system, archaeologists found that the bones of a dog inside the remains of an aristocratic home that burned down during the reign of Emperor Septimius Severus in the 2nd century C.E.

The same construction project also uncovered the military barracks of emperor Hadrian’s Praetorian Guard.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL REPORT ON FINDINGS FROM ROMAN FORT AT HADRIAN’S WALL

ARCHAEOLOGICAL REPORT ON FINDINGS FROM ROMAN FORT AT HADRIAN’S WALL

An archaeological report on findings from Roman fort at Hadrian’s Wall Segedunum Roman Fort and Museum—A new archaeological report hailed as the definitive full account of the excavations of Hadrian’s Wall at its eastern end has just been published. Hadrian’s Wall at Wallsend is written…